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Plantation Shutters for Sunrooms

Sunrooms are great, but in many parts of the country they are down right unbearable during the intense summer and winter months.

Have you ever thought about Plantation Shutters for your sunroom?

Plantation Shutters will:

  • Add greater energy efficency, saving you money
  • Allow greater control of intense sunlight that can fade furnishings
  • Add beauty and charm to your sunroom

In order to maximize the original purpose of the room (openness to the outside) there are a few design tips to keep in mind.

  • Order a large louver size (the larger the better)
  • Consider adding hidden tilt, to keep the least amount of obstruction to your view
  • Order your shutter panels as large as is reasonable with your window configuration.  This will minize the presence of too many stiles (vertical piece of the shutter) taking up more space than necessary.  Kirtz will build custom shutters with warranty up to 38″ wide.  We’ve often successfully built larger than 38″ wide panels, consult a sales rep for more details if you are interested.

Customization for Your Needs

The standard plantation shutter in a sunroom is typically set in a frame, and the shutter panel is hinged to the frame.

Another option is to place your shutters on a sliding track.  The benefit of this configuration is that one shutter panel will slide over another, fully opening up 1/2 of the window without swinging into the room.   This makes furniture placement much easier.  However, determining if this application will work for your sunroom is important, as a slider shutter frame is typically 5 1/2″ deep, compared to a standard shutter frame that is only 2- 2 1/2″ deep.

sunroom before shutters

sunroom before shutters

plantation shutter panels closed, louver open

plantation shutter panels closed, louver open

shutter panels slid open, louvers closed

shutter panels slid open, louvers closed

Distressed Shutters, and Specialty Finishes on Plantation Shutters

Recently we have worked on a number of projects that have required specialty multi-step finishes.  Distressed Shutters have been especially popular lately.   This is one of my favorite things that we do, because we do it very well.    Lots of kudos must be given to the head of our finish department, Allen.   He has both the skill and the willingness to do this type of work.

How does this process work?

Any time we match a finish we request a physical sample.  This is incredibly important in specialty finishes because each finish is unique.   Did the original finisher have a heavy hand, or a light hand when he wiped off the glaze?  What tool was used to do the distressing?  A wire brush?  Chains?  A wheel?  There are an incredible number of variables, and since these shutters are often going up against millwork or paneling, it is critical to get a good match.

So we bring a sample that shows the finished look,  and the stain department does a strike-off (or sample) of their ability to replicate the finish on your plantation shutters.  This is then provided to the homeowner/designer for their approval.  Once approved, we proceed with the finish work.  Distressed, glazed, antiqued and sand thru finishes are going to have a longer than average lead time, due to the complexity of the finish.  But just like fine wine, it’s worth the wait.

Here are just a couple of photos of specialty finishes that have gone through our factory lately.

stained, distressed red oak shutters

stained, distressed red oak shutters

exterior shutters with a sand through finish

exterior shutters with a sand through finish

painted and glazed knotty alder result in an antique distressed look

painted and glazed knotty alder result in an antique distressed look

As nice as these distressed and specialty finished shutters look, they are all an effort to duplicate an old world look.  And the best way to get an authentic old work look is to use old wood.

Enter wormy chestnut……

For a history of this wood, see this link to our site http://kirtz.preview.interworks.com/hardwoods/wormy-chestnut.html
The short version of the story is its old, like 100 years old.  So all that patina and distressing was actually earned by the wood through years of use.  Pretty cool, huh?   The picture below shows wormy chestnut shutters with a tobacco hued stain.  It looks great with a clear finish too, but this stain really gives it some nice warmth.  This wood, more than any other wood, is one that people gravitate towards when we put it on display.
wormy chestnut with a tobacco finish
Another wood that gives a nice authentic decayed look is Pecky Cypress. This wood has been attacked by a fungus that eats the wood.  This in turn makes lens shaped pockets throughout the tree.  The result is a very attractive multi-dimensional wood.   We treated this pecky cypress hardwood shutter with a heavy black glaze, thus intensifying the appearance of variation of the surface.
Pecky Cypress with a glazed finish

Pecky Cypress with a glazed finish

This is just a sampling of our work that I could pull up quickly this afternoon to show the variety in finishing techniques we use.  If you don’t see what you are after, that is only because you haven’t asked us to build (and finish) it yet.  Give us a call and lets see what we can do for you!