Plantation Shutter Installation in Casement Windows

Casement windows offer one of the most complicated installation concerns of any type of window. There are several options for fitting a casement window with plantation shutters.  Lets consider them all.

Direct Hinge

This is when a shutter hinges directly into the window jamb.  You need enough depth in the window jamb (about 1 1/4″ for a Kirtz Shutters) to contain the shutter panel plus room for any hardware (magnets or ball catches). Some times we can make it work with less than this, but it requires that your hinge protrude past the jamb a bit and it really isn’t the best look.   The pro’s with this application is it can be a very clean, simple look.  The con’s are that if your window is out of square the light gaps around the shutter will be uneven and will magnify the imperfections of the window.

Kirtz Modified Direct Hinge… aka  “Wood Return Fit”

A similar option available when using Kirtz Installation Services is called a “wood return fit”.  That means we build the shutters slightly oversized, and before they are finished our installers come to your home and fit them custom to your window.  We then take them back to the factory and finish them.  The end result is a clean look with even light reveal around the shutter.    This picture is an example of a wood return fit plantation shutter installation in Wichita KS.

Wood Return Fit Shutters (hinged to jamb)

Wood Return Fit Shutters (hinged to jamb)

Top Mount

A second option is to top mount the shutter outside the window jamb.  Some window manufacturers make this a necessary option, with a stair stepped window jamb that leaves no room to mount a shutter frame.  This picture is an example of a shutter mounted over casing.  Notice how this frame waterfalls down, minimizing the feeling of a frame protruding into the room.    That is most individuals biggest concern with a top mount, especially when they have just built new and invested in a great millwork package.

Top Mount DL Frame- Room View

Top Mount DL Frame- Room View

Top Mount DL- Close up

Top Mount DL- Close up

Which leads me to my favorite option….

Notching The Frame

In my experience, not a lot of manufacturers or installers want to explore this option, and it is a bit difficult, but it can be a great look, and not cover your casing.    You need a minimum amount of mounting depth (at least 1/2″).  Typically this works best with our L, BLD or BZ frame (for more info on frames see our customer service link, and click on the installation guide)  Once we determine where to mount the frame, we look to see how much it obstructs the the window crank, and if it obstructs the lever lock.  (In a double window configuration, the lever locks are typically in the center and are not a concern.)     We then determine how much of the frame to notch out so that you can still rotate the crank and open the window.  When its done at the factory, it gets cut before the frame is painted/stained and offers a very finished look.  Here is an example.

Notch to accommodate Inside Mount Plantation Shutter with casement window

Notch to accommodate Inside Mount Plantation Shutter with casement window

Now for those pesky single windows, with the lever locks on the right or left jamb.   Many times we can cut a radius notch around the lever area, allowing a full range of motion for the lever to operate.  Here is a shop drawing of what that notch looks like in a BZ.

Round notch for lever lock

Round notch for lever lock

If you have notching to do, it is easiest to use our installation and measure services.  Our sales people are well trained on all the options for notching, and an expert eye can catch concerns that should be addressed on the front end for the best look.  If you are a long distance customer and that is not an option,  call us at 800-416-6455 and we will guide you to a good reseller or work directly with you.  It is amazing what you can accomplish with email and digital photography!